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Children petrified by reports about terror attacks turning to Childline for help

Online bullying is rapidly becoming the main form of bullying that children and young people contact Childline about Getty Images Online bullying is rapidly becoming the main form of bullying that children and young people contact Childline about Getty Images
Irmina Pasquarelli | 14 Novembre, 2016, 08:24

The NSPCC's helpline service Childline counselled 4,541 children across the United Kingdom about online bullying in 2015-16 compared with only 2,410 in 2011-12.

On the anniversary of the Paris attacks, the NSPCC has revealed that its Childline service is helping a growing number of children who are deeply troubled by the ongoing threat of terrorism.

In the same period 873 counselling sessions took place with children from Scotland about all forms of bullying.

Matt Forde, national head of service for NSPCC Scotland, said: "Online bullying is one of the biggest child protection challenges of this generation. Childline is always here to listen to a child, and our helpline can offer adults advice on how to comfort and talk to children about hard topics". "I haven't been sleeping because it is all I can think about". I have tried talking to my parents about it but they said I was over-thinking things.

Across the United Kingdom one in five of the contacts to the free, anonymous service, were from young people aged 11 or younger.

The charity said youngsters aged 12 to 15 were the most likely to speak to counsellors.

Where the age was known, a fifth of contacts about terrorism were from children aged 11 and under, while girls were twice as likely as boys to seek support from the service.

Trained counsellors recommend letting your child know that that they can talk openly with you about their concerns, do not panic them, and make them feel safe and loved.

Parents can also help their child by asking them about what they know and how they feel about it, areeing such attacks are frightening and sad, but reassure them that adults are doing everything they can to stop these incidents, a spokesperson confirmed.

It is the first year the service has specifically recorded contacts concerning terrorism after a surge in the wake of the Paris massacre.

Any young person who is anxious can call Childline free and anonymously on 0800 11 11 11 and adults who want advice on how to talk to their child about terrorism can call the NSPCC Helpline on 0808 800 5000. Download it today and continue to enjoy STV News wherever you are.

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